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Jin Shin Fee

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100 years ago, a Japanese student, the later Master Jiro Murai, discovered, researched, practised and taught the healing art, which is innate as a wisdom of mankind.
 

In remembrance of this discovery, on October 13th, 2012, at 3 p.m. [CET], around the entire world, followers of this healing art practise 8 finger mudras for one hour, to embrace the whole world with this wonderful healing art.

 

The historic background:

Jiro Murai as a student became gravely ill. He was even thought to be dying, because doctors could not help him.
So he drew back into solitude, practising 8 selected mudras for 7 days.
 
He recovered and in gratitude, as commitment, he made an oath to dedicate his life to this art and make it known and available to everybody.
 
He increased his knowledge by practising with homeless people. His fame even reached the Japanese Emperor, who invited him and allowed him to study in his so far closed library.
There he found the collected knowledge of the books of wisdom from all over the world and from different cultures. He discovered the roots of this healing art, which go back to the wisdom of mankind.
 
During the years, he called this art differently:

  • The art of happiness
  • The art of long life
  • The art of benevolence
  • Human, Creator, Art
    (In the meaning of: The Art of the Creator through the Human being.)

During the years, various names came up according to different practitioners and so also the name of Jin Shin Fee.
 
Jiro Murai during his life had two pupils, who intensively studied the healing art with him.
The first was Mary Burmeister, who brought this knowledge to America, from where she spread this art via her pupils over the whole world.
The second is the Japanese Kato Sensei, who took over the tradition in Japan.